Category Archives: The Oxford Comment

Open Access – Episode 58 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, Rhiannon Meaden, a Senior Publisher for Journals at OUP, and Danny Altmann, editor-in-chief of Oxford Open Immunology, cover the basics of Open Access, OUP’s drive to disseminate academic research as widely as possible, and how easily-accessible research has impacted various academic fields around the world. This last fact is especially important as the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Voter Fraud and Election Meddling – Episode 57 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with three scholars who specialize in electoral intervention, voter turnout, and voting laws. Caroline Tolbert and Michael Ritter, co-authors of Accessible Elections: How the States Can Help Americans Vote, and Dov Levin, author of Meddling in the Ballot Box: The Causes and Effects of Partisan Electoral Interventions, answered our questions about voting and offered solutions for the safety and security of the 2020 US presidential election and elections in the future.

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Urban Studies, City Life, and COVID-19 – Episode 56 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with three scholars involved in the launch of the upcoming Oxford Bibliographies in Urban Studies. Editor-in-Chief Richard Dilworth and authors Zack Taylor (“Toronto”) and James Mansell (“Urban Soundscapes”) discussed the new OBO subject at large, their individual contributions, and attempted to answer for us the question on everyone’s mind: what is the future of cities in a post-COVID world?

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Art and Theater After Stonewall – Episode 55 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with Elizabeth Wollman, author of “Hard Times: The Adult Musical in 1970s New York City,” and Micah Salkind, author of “Do You Remember House?: Chicago’s Queer of Color Undergrounds,” on the convergence of LBGTQ culture and art, especially in the aftermath of the 1969 Stonewall riots and other movements focusing on gay rights in the late 1960s and 1970s.

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Earth Day at 50: Conservation, Spirituality, and Climate Change – Episode 54 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. We spoke with Ted Steinberg, author of “Down to Earth: Nature’s Role in American History,” Belden Lane, author of “The Great Conversation: Nature and the Care of the Soul,” Lufti Radwan of Willowbrook Farm, and Buddy Huffaker, executive director of the Aldo Leopold Foundation, about conservation history, spirituality, organic farming, land ethics, and, of course, climate change.

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Taking a Knee: Sports and Activism – Episode 53 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode, we examine the difficulties athletes face when they speak out on hot-button subjects with the help of documentary filmmaker Trish Dalton, co-director and co-producer of HBO Sports’ “Student Athlete,” and Robert Turner, author of “Not For Long: The Life and Career of the NFL Athlete.” Activism can be incredibly difficult in professional sports, let alone in collegiate athletics, and we look at the political plights of athletes in the wake of the firestorm created by quarterback Colin Kaepernick a few years ago.

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Based On A True Story – Episode 52 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode, we examine the significant role of academic consultants within television and movies, with the help of author and consultant, Diana Walsh Pasulka.  The use of consultants on set has steadily increased since the early twentieth century, and we investigate why this trend has become a popular practice, and how it impacts the audience, the success of the project and its cultural impact on society.

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The History Of Holiday Traditions – Episode 51 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of the Oxford Comment, we examine the history of holiday traditions and attempt to figure out why we continue to celebrate them; even the strange ones. Our guest, Gerry Bowler, author of “Christmas in the Crosshairs: Two Thousand Years of Denouncing and Defending the World’s Most Celebrated Holiday” explores the entire sweep of Christmas history and provides a global scope of its influence.

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The Politics of Food – Episode 50 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we explore the social, economic and psychological issues that families face, when providing meals year-round, especially during Thanksgiving and the holidays. From parent-shaming to the expense of eating organic, the food we eat says more than meets the eye. With the help of the authors of “Pressure Cooker: Why Home Cooking Won’t Solve Our Problems and What we Can Do About It” we tackle the million dollar question; how do families approach the conversation of food?

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Technology, Privacy and Politics Minisode – Episode 49.2 – The Oxford Comment



On this minisode of The Oxford Comment, Katelyn Phillips sits down with Lexi Beach, owner of Astoria Bookshop, to discuss how politics play a role in stacking the shelves at independent bookstores.

Follow @astoriabookshop on Twitter
Facebook: facebook.com/astoriabookshop
www.astoriabookshop.com

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