American Business History – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 34



In this episode, Walter A. Friedman introduces American business history and its evolution since the early 20th century when the United States was first described as a ‘business civilization’.

Learn more about “American Business History: A Very Short Introduction” here:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/american-business-history-a-very-short-introduction-9780190622473

Walter A. Friedman is a historian and lecturer at Harvard Business School, where he directs the Business History Initiative and curriculum development at the Case Method Project. He is author of Birth of a Salesman: The Transformation of Selling in America and Fortune Tellers: The Story of America’s First Economic Forecasters.

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– Spotify: https://oxford.ly/3dxUJuP
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© Oxford University Press


The Animal Kingdom – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 33



In this episode, Peter Holland introduces the animal kingdom and explains how our understanding of the animal world has been vastly enhanced by analysis of DNA and the study of evolution and development in recent years.

Learn more about The Animal Kingdom: A Very Short Introduction here:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/american-business-history-a-very-short-introduction-9780190622473

Peter Holland is Linacre Professor of Zoology and Head of the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Merton College, Oxford. After a degree in Zoology and a PhD in Genetics he has spent the last 20 years undertaking research into the evolution of the animal kingdom, focussing primarily on the genetic and developmental differences between animal groups.

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– Blubrry: https://oxford.ly/2IVCep0
– Google Podcasts: https://oxford.ly/34W2bvY
– SoundCloud: https://oxford.ly/3nPvtoD
– Spotify: https://oxford.ly/3dxUJuP
– Stitcher: https://oxford.ly/3k9kEvH

© Oxford University Press


The Gothic – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 32



In this episode Nick Groom introduces the Gothic, a wildly diverse term which has a far-reaching influence across culture and society, from ecclesiastical architecture to cult horror films and political theorists to contemporary fashion.

Learn more about The Gothic: A Very Short Introduction here:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-gothic-a-very-short-introduction-9780199586790

Nick Groom is Professor of English Literature at the University of Macau. He has published widely for both academic and popular readerships, and is the author and editor of many books, including Oxford World’s Classics editions of Frankenstein (2018), The Italian (2017), The Monk (2016), and The Castle of Otranto (2014).

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– SoundCloud: https://oxford.ly/3nPvtoD
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– Stitcher: https://oxford.ly/3k9kEvH

© Oxford University Press


The SHAPE of Things – Episode 61 – The Oxford Comment



In January, Oxford University Press announced its support for SHAPE, a new collective name for the humanities, arts, and social sciences and an equivalent term to STEM. SHAPE stands for Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts for People and the Economy and aims to underline the value that these disciplines bring to society. Over the last year or so, huge attention has—rightly—been placed on scientific and technological advancement but does that mean we’re overlooking the contribution of SHAPE in finding solutions to global issues?

Today’s episode of The Oxford Comment brings together two leading voices from SHAPE and STEM disciplines to discuss how we might achieve greater balance between sciences and the arts. In the episode, Dr Kathryn Murphy, a Fellow in English Literature at Oriel College at the University of Oxford and the co-editor of On Essays, and Professor Tom McLeish, inaugural Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics at the University of York and the author of The Poetry and Music of Science, discuss the origins of the SHAPE/STEM divide and what might be done to address it.

Learn more about On Essays and Kathryn Murphy here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/on-essays-9780198707868
Learn more about The Poetry and Music of Science and Tom McLeish here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-poetry-and-music-of-science-9780198797999

Please check out Episode 61 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
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– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Ella Percival and Bethany Drew
Host: Julia Baker
Humanities Correspondant: Thomas Woollard

© Oxford University Press


Samurai – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 31



In this episode, Michael Wert introduces samurai, whose influence in society and presence during watershed moments in Japanese history are often overlooked by modern audiences.

Learn more about Samurai: A Very Short Introduction here:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/samurai-a-very-short-introduction-9780190685072

Michael Wert is Associate Professor of East Asian History at Marquette University. Specializing in early modern and modern Japan, he is also the author of Meiji Restoration Losers: Memory and Tokugawa Supporters in Modern Japan.

Follow The Very Short Introductions Podcast on:
– Apple Podcasts: https://oxford.ly/2SQQ79R
– Blubrry: https://oxford.ly/2IVCep0
– Google Podcasts: https://oxford.ly/34W2bvY
– SoundCloud: https://oxford.ly/3nPvtoD
– Spotify: https://oxford.ly/3dxUJuP
– Stitcher: https://oxford.ly/3k9kEvH

© Oxford University Press