Tag Archives: The Oxford Comment

Holiday Cheer – Episode 67 – The Oxford Comment



As we approach the end of 2021, we can look back at the previous two years of restrictions, lockdowns, COVID tests and vaccination lines, not to mention all the political strife… or we can look to the unknown, ahead to the new year. But let us pause for a moment and enjoy the now: a holiday season that should be livelier than last year’s. After all that’s gone on, we could use some old-fashioned holiday cheer.

On today’s episode, in the spirit of the holiday season, we spoke with Editor-in-chief David Wondrich and Associate Editor Noah Rothbaum of The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails to talk about their book, the growth of cocktail culture, and some of their favorite holiday drinks from around the world. Then, to speak on Christmas traditions, we revisited our interview with Gerry Bowler, the author of Christmas in the Crosshairs: Two Thousand Years of Denouncing and Defending the World’s Most Celebrated Holiday, from an Oxford Comment of Christmas Past.

Learn more about David Wondrich and Noah Rothbaum and The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-companion-to-spirits-and-cocktails-9780199311132
Learn more about Gerry Bowler and Christmas in the Crosshairs here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/christmas-in-the-crosshairs-9780190499006

Please check out Episode 68 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Erin Cox and Tom Woollard
Host: Tom Wollard

© Oxford University Press


COVID-19 and Mental Health: Where do we go from here? – Episode 67 – The Oxford Comment



The effects of COVID-19 reach far beyond mortality, triggering widespread economic and sociopolitical consequences. It is unsurprising to learn, after everything that has transpired in the past two years, that COVID-19 has also had a detrimental effect on our mental health. Recent studies in the US and UK have shown a huge increase in the number of adults who have experienced symptoms of an anxiety or depressive disorder over pre-pandemic figures.

On today’s episode, we spoke with Professor Seamas Donnelly, editor of QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, and Dr. John C. Markowitz, author of In the Aftermath of the Pandemic: Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Anxiety, Depression, and PTSD, to explore the factors behind these figures, COVID-19’s impact on our mental health, and where we go from here.

Learn more about Seamas Donnelly and QJM here: https://academic.oup.com/qjmed
Learn more about John C. Markowitz and In the Aftermath of the Pandemic here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/in-the-aftermath-of-the-pandemic-9780197554500
Learn more about COVID-19 and mental health here: https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/mental-health-and-covid-19

Please check out Episode 67 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Meghan Schaffer, Victoria Sparkman, and Christine Scalora
Host: Christine Scalora

© Oxford University Press


What is the impact of opening research? – Episode 66 – The Oxford Comment



Open research means faster, more equitable access to cutting edge findings, driving disciplines forward, and introducing transparency into the research process. As the world’s largest university press publisher of open access content, Oxford University Press believes a more open world should work for everyone.

Over the past few years, the movement has grown to encompass other aspects of the research journey, from data sets to peer review, and open research has grown up as an umbrella term of experimentation with opening up in all of these areas. So what is the impact of opening research?

For today’s episode of the Oxford Comment, posted during International Open Access Week, we spoke with Dr Tara Spires Jones, Editor in Chief of Brain Communications, Professor Ugo Panizza, Editor in Chief of Oxford Open Economics, Professor Marcus Munafo, Editor in Chief of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, and Adam Leary, Senior Publisher in OUP’s Open Access Publishing team, who offered their perspectives on the impact of opening research.

Learn more about Tara Spires-Jones and Brain Communications here: https://academic.oup.com/braincomms
Learn more about Ugo Panizza and Oxford Open Economics here: https://academic.oup.com/ooec
Learn more about Marcus Munafo and Nicotine and Tobacco Research here: https://academic.oup.com/ntr
Learn more about Open Access at Oxford University Press here: https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access

Please check out Episode 66 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Ella Percival
Host: Rachel Havard

© Oxford University Press


Environmental Histories and Potential Futures – Episode 60 – The Oxford Comment



The academic fields of both environmental history and future studies originated in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s during the rise of the mainstream environmental movement. On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we are joined by environmental historian Erin Stewart Mauldin, author Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South, and Jennifer Gidley, the past president of the World Futures Studies and author of The Future: A Very Short Introduction, to learn more about how these two areas of study look at our relationship with the environment and how these valuable perspectives can engage, and inform, our environmental understanding.

Learn more about Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South and Erin Stewart Mauldin here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/unredeemed-land-9780190865177
Learn more about The Future: A Very Short Introduction and Jennifer Gidley here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-future-a-very-short-introduction-9780198735281

Please check out Episode 60 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Sarah Butcher
Host: Julia Baker
Humanities Correspondant: Thomas Woollard
Social Sciences Correspondant: Christine Scalora

© Oxford University Press


Government Transparency and the Freedom of Information – Episode 59 – The Oxford Comment



Last episode of The Oxford Comment, we talked about Open Access and the importance of the accessibility of academic research for the betterment of society. This episode, we are joined by Himanshu Jha, the author of Capturing Institutional Change: The Case of the Right to Information Act in India, and Vivien A. Schmidt, the author of Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone, to discuss government transparency and the flow of information from those in power to the citizens who ultimately give them power.

© Oxford University Press