Category Archives: The Oxford Comment

COVID-19 and Mental Health: Where do we go from here? – Episode 67 – The Oxford Comment



The effects of COVID-19 reach far beyond mortality, triggering widespread economic and sociopolitical consequences. It is unsurprising to learn, after everything that has transpired in the past two years, that COVID-19 has also had a detrimental effect on our mental health. Recent studies in the US and UK have shown a huge increase in the number of adults who have experienced symptoms of an anxiety or depressive disorder over pre-pandemic figures.

On today’s episode, we spoke with Professor Seamas Donnelly, editor of QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, and Dr. John C. Markowitz, author of In the Aftermath of the Pandemic: Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Anxiety, Depression, and PTSD, to explore the factors behind these figures, COVID-19’s impact on our mental health, and where we go from here.

Learn more about Seamas Donnelly and QJM here: https://academic.oup.com/qjmed
Learn more about John C. Markowitz and In the Aftermath of the Pandemic here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/in-the-aftermath-of-the-pandemic-9780197554500
Learn more about COVID-19 and mental health here: https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/mental-health-and-covid-19

Please check out Episode 67 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Meghan Schaffer, Victoria Sparkman, and Christine Scalora
Host: Christine Scalora

© Oxford University Press


What is the impact of opening research? – Episode 66 – The Oxford Comment



Open research means faster, more equitable access to cutting edge findings, driving disciplines forward, and introducing transparency into the research process. As the world’s largest university press publisher of open access content, Oxford University Press believes a more open world should work for everyone.

Over the past few years, the movement has grown to encompass other aspects of the research journey, from data sets to peer review, and open research has grown up as an umbrella term of experimentation with opening up in all of these areas. So what is the impact of opening research?

For today’s episode of the Oxford Comment, posted during International Open Access Week, we spoke with Dr Tara Spires Jones, Editor in Chief of Brain Communications, Professor Ugo Panizza, Editor in Chief of Oxford Open Economics, Professor Marcus Munafo, Editor in Chief of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, and Adam Leary, Senior Publisher in OUP’s Open Access Publishing team, who offered their perspectives on the impact of opening research.

Learn more about Tara Spires-Jones and Brain Communications here: https://academic.oup.com/braincomms
Learn more about Ugo Panizza and Oxford Open Economics here: https://academic.oup.com/ooec
Learn more about Marcus Munafo and Nicotine and Tobacco Research here: https://academic.oup.com/ntr
Learn more about Open Access at Oxford University Press here: https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access

Please check out Episode 66 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Ella Percival
Host: Rachel Havard

© Oxford University Press


What is Public Debt? – Episode 65 – The Oxford Comment



What do you think of when you hear the term “public debt?” If you’re familiar with the phrase, you might think about elected officials debating budgets and how to pay for goods and services. Or maybe it’s a vague concept you don’t fully understand.

For today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with In Defense of Public Debt co-author Barry Eichengreen, Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and Jonathan D. Ostry, Deputy Director of the Asia and Pacific Department at the International Monetary Fund, about misconceptions of public debt, how the role of public debt has changed throughout history, and how pandemics such as COVID-19 can affect inequality and the role of public debt in these situations

Learn more about In Defense of Public Debt by Barry Eichengreen, Asmaa El-Ganainy, Rui Esteves, and Kris James Mitchener here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/in-defense-of-public-debt-9780197577899
Learn more about “The rise in inequality after pandemics: can fiscal support play a mitigating role?” by Jonathan D. Ostry, Davide Furceri, Prakash Loungani, and Pietro Pizzuto here: https://academic.oup.com/icc/article/30/2/445/6312882#267092392

Please check out Episode 65 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Christine Scalora, Erin Cox
Host: Christine Scalora

© Oxford University Press


The Power of Words – Episode 64 – The Oxford Comment



We’re all familiar with the phrase “words have power”—but in a political and cultural climate where we become more aware of the power that money, influence, and privilege have every day—how do people wield the power of words?

On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with philosopher Myisha Cherry and poet Carmen Bugan to talk about how they see their disciplines addressing the questions of language, oppression, and resistance, and exactly what tools the arts and humanities provide to address injustice.

Learn more about The Case for Rage: Why Anger is Essential to Anti-Racist Struggle by Myisha Cherry here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-case-for-rage-9780197557341
Learn more about Poetry and the Language of Oppression: Essays on Politics and Poetics by Carmen Bugan here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/poetry-and-the-language-of-oppression-9780198868323

Please check out Episode 64 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Sarah Butcher
Host: Tom Woollard

© Oxford University Press


The Neuroscience of Human Consciousness – Episode 63 – The Oxford Comment



On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we focused on human consciousness and how studying the neurological basis for human cognition can lead not only to better health but a better understanding of human culture, language, and society as well.

We are joined today by Dr. John Parrington, author of the newly published book Mind Shift: How Culture Transformed the Human Brain, and Professor Anil Seth, Editor-in-Chief of the Open Access journal Neuroscience of Consciousness­, to learn more about the study of human consciousness and how it can help us to understand autism spectrum disorders, mental illnesses, and neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, the focus of this year’s World Brain Day (July 22).

Learn more about Mind Shift: How Culture Transformed the Human Brain and John Parrington here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/mind-shift-9780198801634
Learn more about Neuroscience of Consciousness and Anil Seth here: https://academic.oup.com/nc

Please check out Episode 63 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Victoria Sparkman
Host: Julia Baker
Science Correspondant: Victoria Sparkman

© Oxford University Press