Category Archives: The Oxford Comment

The SHAPE of Things – Episode 61 – The Oxford Comment



In January, Oxford University Press announced its support for SHAPE, a new collective name for the humanities, arts, and social sciences and an equivalent term to STEM. SHAPE stands for Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts for People and the Economy and aims to underline the value that these disciplines bring to society. Over the last year or so, huge attention has—rightly—been placed on scientific and technological advancement but does that mean we’re overlooking the contribution of SHAPE in finding solutions to global issues?

Today’s episode of The Oxford Comment brings together two leading voices from SHAPE and STEM disciplines to discuss how we might achieve greater balance between sciences and the arts. In the episode, Dr Kathryn Murphy, a Fellow in English Literature at Oriel College at the University of Oxford and the co-editor of On Essays, and Professor Tom McLeish, inaugural Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Department of Physics at the University of York and the author of The Poetry and Music of Science, discuss the origins of the SHAPE/STEM divide and what might be done to address it.

Learn more about On Essays and Kathryn Murphy here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/on-essays-9780198707868
Learn more about The Poetry and Music of Science and Tom McLeish here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-poetry-and-music-of-science-9780198797999

Please check out Episode 61 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Ella Percival and Bethany Drew
Host: Julia Baker
Humanities Correspondant: Thomas Woollard

© Oxford University Press


Environmental Histories and Potential Futures – Episode 60 – The Oxford Comment



The academic fields of both environmental history and future studies originated in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s during the rise of the mainstream environmental movement. On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we are joined by environmental historian Erin Stewart Mauldin, author Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South, and Jennifer Gidley, the past president of the World Futures Studies and author of The Future: A Very Short Introduction, to learn more about how these two areas of study look at our relationship with the environment and how these valuable perspectives can engage, and inform, our environmental understanding.

Learn more about Unredeemed Land: An Environmental History of Civil War and Emancipation in the Cotton South and Erin Stewart Mauldin here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/unredeemed-land-9780190865177
Learn more about The Future: A Very Short Introduction and Jennifer Gidley here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-future-a-very-short-introduction-9780198735281

Please check out Episode 60 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producer: Sarah Butcher
Host: Julia Baker
Humanities Correspondant: Thomas Woollard
Social Sciences Correspondant: Christine Scalora

© Oxford University Press


Government Transparency and the Freedom of Information – Episode 59 – The Oxford Comment



Last episode of The Oxford Comment, we talked about Open Access and the importance of the accessibility of academic research for the betterment of society. This episode, we are joined by Himanshu Jha, the author of Capturing Institutional Change: The Case of the Right to Information Act in India, and Vivien A. Schmidt, the author of Europe’s Crisis of Legitimacy: Governing by Rules and Ruling by Numbers in the Eurozone, to discuss government transparency and the flow of information from those in power to the citizens who ultimately give them power.

© Oxford University Press


Open Access – Episode 58 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, Rhiannon Meaden, a Senior Publisher for Journals at OUP, and Danny Altmann, editor-in-chief of Oxford Open Immunology, cover the basics of Open Access, OUP’s drive to disseminate academic research as widely as possible, and how easily-accessible research has impacted various academic fields around the world. This last fact is especially important as the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic.

© Oxford University Press


Voter Fraud and Election Meddling – Episode 57 – The Oxford Comment



On this episode of The Oxford Comment, we spoke with three scholars who specialize in electoral intervention, voter turnout, and voting laws. Caroline Tolbert and Michael Ritter, co-authors of Accessible Elections: How the States Can Help Americans Vote, and Dov Levin, author of Meddling in the Ballot Box: The Causes and Effects of Partisan Electoral Interventions, answered our questions about voting and offered solutions for the safety and security of the 2020 US presidential election and elections in the future.

© Oxford University Press