Documentary Film – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 44



In this episode, Patricia Aufderheide introduces documentary film, a diverse genre that encompasses films from March of the Penguins to Fahrenheit 9/11 but is always rooted in the desire to represent reality.

Learn more about “Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction” here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/documentary-film-a-very-short-introduction-9780195182705

Patricia Aufderheide is a professor in the School of Communication at American University in Washington, D.C., and founder-director of its Center for Social Media. She received the career achievement award for scholarship from the International Documentary Association in 2006 and has served as a Sundance Film Festival juror and as a board member of the Independent Television Service. She is the author, most recently, of The Daily Planet: A Critic on the Capitalist Culture Beat.

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© Oxford University Press


Women’s Economic Empowerment, Past and Future – Episode 70 – The Oxford Comment



On today’s episode of The Oxford Comment, we discussed the global and historical implications of women, work, and economic empowerment.

First, we welcomed Laura M. Argys and Susan L. Averett, the authors of Women in the Workforce: What Everyone Needs to Know®, to share their research on women’s growing role in the workforce and the problems with definitively measuring the gender wage gap. We then interviewed, Laura Edwards, the author of Only the Clothes on Her Back: Clothing and the Hidden History of Power in the Nineteenth-Century United States, looking at the 19th century legal status of textiles and how they provided a unique path to economic empowerment for women and people of color.

Learn more about Laura M. Argys and Susan L. Averett and Women in the Workforce here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/women-in-the-workforce-9780190093389
Learn more about Laura F. Edwards and Only the Clothes on Her Back here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/only-the-clothes-on-her-back-9780197568576

Please check out Episode 70 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Sarah Butcher
Host: Rachel Havard

Music: Filaments by Podington Bear is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.

© Oxford University Press


The Color Line: Race and Education in the United States – Episode 69 – The Oxford Comment



Black History Month celebrates the achievements of a globally marginalized community still fighting for equal representation and opportunity in all areas of life. This includes education.

In 1954, the United States’ Supreme Court ruled “separate but equal” unconstitutional for American public schools in “Brown v. Board of Education.” While this ruling has been celebrated as a pivotal victory for civil rights, it has not endured without challenge.

On today’s episode, we spoke with Zoë Burkholder, author of An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North and Color in the Classroom: How American Schools Taught Race, 1900-1954, and Nina M. Yancy, author of the upcoming How the Color Line Bends: The Geography of White Prejudice in Modern America, examining issues around education, integration, and segregation through their scholarship. In particular, we discussed segregation in northern schools and a recent case study from Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Learn more about Zoe Burkholder and An African American Dilemma here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/an-african-american-dilemma-9780190605131 and Color in the Classroom here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/color-in-the-classroom-9780190209322
Learn more about Nina M. Yancy and How the Color Line Bends here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/how-the-color-line-bends-9780197599433

Please check out Episode 69 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Christine Scalora and Meghan Schaffer
Host: Meghan Schaffer

Music: Filaments by Podington Bear is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.

© Oxford University Press


Holiday Cheer – Episode 68 – The Oxford Comment



As we approach the end of 2021, we can look back at the previous two years of restrictions, lockdowns, COVID tests and vaccination lines, not to mention all the political strife… or we can look to the unknown, ahead to the new year. But let us pause for a moment and enjoy the now: a holiday season that should be livelier than last year’s. After all that’s gone on, we could use some old-fashioned holiday cheer.

On today’s episode, in the spirit of the holiday season, we spoke with Editor-in-chief David Wondrich and Associate Editor Noah Rothbaum of The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails to talk about their book, the growth of cocktail culture, and some of their favorite holiday drinks from around the world. Then, to speak on Christmas traditions, we revisited our interview with Gerry Bowler, the author of Christmas in the Crosshairs: Two Thousand Years of Denouncing and Defending the World’s Most Celebrated Holiday, from an Oxford Comment of Christmas Past.

Learn more about David Wondrich and Noah Rothbaum and The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-companion-to-spirits-and-cocktails-9780199311132
Learn more about Gerry Bowler and Christmas in the Crosshairs here: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/christmas-in-the-crosshairs-9780190499006

Please check out Episode 68 of The Oxford Comment and subscribe to The Oxford Comment through your favourite podcast app to listen to the latest insights from our expert authors:
– Apple Podcasts: oxford.ly/2RuYMPa
– Google Podcasts: oxford.ly/38UpF5h
– Spotify: oxford.ly/2JLNTTO
– Stitcher: oxford.ly/2R0fVNZ
– Youtube: oxford.ly/2YY4iMT

The Oxford Comment Crew:
Executive Producer: Steven Filippi
Associate Producers: Erin Cox and Tom Woollard
Host: Tom Wollard

Music: Filaments by Podington Bear is licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.

© Oxford University Press


Ageing – The Very Short Introductions Podcast – Episode 43



In this episode, Nancy A. Pachana introduces ageing, an activity with which we are familiar from childhood, and the lifelong dynamic changes in biological, psychological, and social functioning associated with it.

Learn more about “Ageing: A Very Short Introduction” here:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/ageing-a-very-short-introduction-9780198725329

Nancy A. Pachana is a Professor of Geropsychology at the University of Queensland, Australia. She is the co-founder and co-director of the UQ Ageing Mind Initiative, which promotes ageing research and translation into policy and practice at the University and beyond.

Follow The Very Short Introductions Podcast on:
– Apple Podcasts: https://oxford.ly/2SQQ79R
– Blubrry: https://oxford.ly/2IVCep0
– Google Podcasts: https://oxford.ly/34W2bvY
– SoundCloud: https://oxford.ly/3nPvtoD
– Spotify: https://oxford.ly/3dxUJuP
– Stitcher: https://oxford.ly/3k9kEvH

© Oxford University Press